Publications

In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

Publications by the Blundell group - 16 hours 57 min ago
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In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

Sci Rep. 2016 Jan 22;6:19848

Authors: Pires DE, Chen J, Blundell TL, Ascher DB

Abstract
Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome this is to use robust, accurate and scalable computational methods to understand and correlate structural effects of mutations with disease.

PMID: 26797105 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Publications

Arpeggio: A web server for calculating and visualising interatomic interactions in protein structures.

Publications by the Blundell group - Mon, 09/01/2017 - 10:58
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Arpeggio: A web server for calculating and visualising interatomic interactions in protein structures.

J Mol Biol. 2016 Dec 10;:

Authors: Jubb HC, Higueruelo AP, Ochoa-Montaño B, Pitt WR, Ascher DB, Blundell TL

Abstract
Interactions between proteins and their ligands, such as small molecules, other proteins and DNA, depend on specific interatomic interactions that can be classified on the basis of atom type, distance and angle constraints. Visualisation of these interactions provides insights into the nature of molecular recognition events, and has practical uses in guiding drug design and understanding the structural and functional impacts of mutations. We present Arpeggio, a web server for calculating interactions within and between proteins and protein, DNA, or small-molecule ligands, including van der Waals', ionic, carbonyl, metal, hydrophobic and halogen-halogen bond contacts, as well as hydrogen bonds specific atom-aromatic ring (cation-π, donor-π, halogen-π and carbon-π) and aromatic ring-aromatic ring (π-π) interactions, within user submitted macromolecule structures. PyMOL session files can be downloaded allowing high quality publication images of the interactions to be generated. Arpeggio is implemented in Python and available as a user-friendly web interface at http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/arpeggio/and as a downloadable package athttps://bitbucket.org/harryjubb/arpeggio.

PMID: 27964945 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Publications

A fragment merging approach towards the development of small molecule inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR for use as ethionamide boosters.

Publications by the Blundell group - Mon, 09/01/2017 - 10:58
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A fragment merging approach towards the development of small molecule inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR for use as ethionamide boosters.

Org Biomol Chem. 2016 Feb 21;14(7):2318-26

Authors: Nikiforov PO, Surade S, Blaszczyk M, Delorme V, Brodin P, Baulard AR, Blundell TL, Abell C

Abstract
With the ever-increasing instances of resistance to frontline TB drugs there is the need to develop novel strategies to fight the worldwide TB epidemic. Boosting the effect of the existing second-line antibiotic ethionamide by inhibiting the mycobacterial transcriptional repressor protein EthR is an attractive therapeutic strategy. Herein we report the use of a fragment based drug discovery approach for the structure-guided systematic merging of two fragment molecules, each binding twice to the hydrophobic cavity of EthR from M. tuberculosis. These together fill the entire binding pocket of EthR. We elaborated these fragment hits and developed small molecule inhibitors which have a 100-fold improvement of potency in vitro over the initial fragments.

PMID: 26806381 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Publications

Mutations at protein-protein interfaces: Small changes over big surfaces have large impacts on human health.

Publications by the Blundell group - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 23:55

Mutations at protein-protein interfaces: Small changes over big surfaces have large impacts on human health.

Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2016 Nov 29;:

Authors: Jubb HC, Pandurangan AP, Turner MA, Ochoa-Montaño B, Blundell TL, Ascher DB

Abstract
Many essential biological processes including cell regulation and signalling are mediated through the assembly of protein complexes. Changes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) interfaces can affect the formation of multiprotein complexes, and consequently lead to disruptions in interconnected networks of PPIs within and between cells, further leading to phenotypic changes as functional interactions are created or disrupted. Mutations altering PPIs have been linked to the development of genetic diseases including cancer and rare Mendelian diseases, and to the development of drug resistance. The importance of these protein mutations has led to the development of many resources for understanding and predicting their effects. We propose that a better understanding of how these mutations affect the structure, function, and formation of multiprotein complexes provides novel opportunities for tackling them, including the development of small-molecule drugs targeted specifically to mutated PPIs.

PMID: 27913149 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Publications

Targeting tuberculosis using structure-guided fragment-based drug design.

Publications by the Blundell group - Tue, 29/11/2016 - 10:15
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Targeting tuberculosis using structure-guided fragment-based drug design.

Drug Discov Today. 2016 Oct 11;:

Authors: Mendes V, Blundell TL

Abstract
Fragment-based drug discovery is now widely used in academia and industry to obtain small molecule inhibitors for a given target and is established for many fields of research including antimicrobials and oncology. Many molecules derived from fragment-based approaches are already in clinical trials and two - vemurafenib and venetoclax - are on the market, but the approach has been used sparsely in the tuberculosis field. Here, we describe the progress of our group and others, and examine the most recent successes and challenges in developing compounds with antimycobacterial activity.

PMID: 27742535 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Publications
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